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How a Freelancer Can Make MORE Money By Working LESS | w/ Austin Saylor

Skyler Irvine:

Do you mind telling me a little bit about Full Harbor and then also touch on Project 200K, please?

Austin Saylor:

Absolutely. So I’m a freelance motion designer, so I’m animating stuff for all sorts of people. And a Full Harbor is a place where it’s basically building a community and a portal for teaching other motion designers how to be better motion designers, and how to be better at the business of motion design. And yeah, Project 200K came about because I realized I was spreading myself personally a little bit too thin too soon, and trying too many things all at once before I got one thing really going good. So I decided to scrap most of the extra courses and programs that I was running and decided to completely focus on freelance, which led to Project 200K, which is my big question of, can you make 200,000 as a freelance motion designer in a year?

Skyler Irvine:

I feel like I should’ve had you write the introduction to Niche Please, you nailed that on the head it was almost like I planned this. I love that explanation. And I love talking to you about this specifically because a lot of people might come across that in here, man, that’s a very, very specific niche you’ve found there. Teaching animations and motion graphics seems extremely niche, how big of a target audience is there? The fear that a lot of people would have when starting a business is, I want to help everyone all the time, when the more success you have is by very narrowly defining who your target is. This seems like a very narrow target, how many people could you really support a business with a niche that small? Did you have any of those fears and what made you commit to that before even expanding onto those other things?

Austin Saylor:

So I come from a background of graphic design UI, UX video production marketing, the creative side of getting the word out for businesses. And I personally wanted to niche into motion design just because it’s like a personal desire. And when I started teaching, the teaching was ridiculously niche. So motion design is pretty niche. I was teaching lettering animation, which I’ve run a course called, The Lettering Animation Course that did extremely well, especially for a first time. It was my first entrepreneurial venture that was selling a product, not a service. And so to me that was… I was making money and I was amazing. And then I branched out and did Full Harbor membership, which was my second product, but that was even more general and a little bit less successful monetarily, I think I’m building a really beautiful community, but it’s like bringing in 6K a year.

Austin Saylor:

So it’s not like a go quit your job to do that kind of thing. And so that’s… The more broad I went, the less successful I was getting. And so that’s when I was like, “You know what? Let’s bring it back in to fully focus on the 200K Project, which is also… I like teaching, and so I’m using it as… Calling it a project is giving me a platform to say, “This is what I’m learning along the way. Here’s what you can take from this.” And starting those conversations about, “What’s your earning potential as something as niche as a freelance motion designer.”

Skyler Irvine:

What made you want to launch your own business when you started Full Harbor for example, as opposed to… you were doing a lot of freelance. Did you enjoy freelance more than trying to work at a big company? Was there any fear along the way, going from freelance to having it be more of an official business kind of brings you back into a corporate atmosphere? What was that journey like for you?

Austin Saylor:

So yeah, I worked at a software company as the catch-all person for a while, it’s like one of two designers. And I wanted to be able to work with a wide range of clients that I got to choose rather than just the same working for the man so to speak, and always working on the same brand. For me it was… I wanted the variety and I wanted the freedom to choose, and so Tim Ferriss was like the linchpin that went, Oop. I’m going to always be an employee too, maybe I want to make money online. And it took like 10 years before I actually pulled the trigger and did something with it. But that whole time I was testing and trying little things here and there. So while I had a full-time job for the first eight years out of college, I was testing and trying little things here and there, side projects. So, if Project 200K looks like a success, it’s 13 years in the making, that whole thing.

Skyler Irvine:

Would you say anything during that corporate experience helped you in something like Project 200K or in Full Harbor?

Austin Saylor:

Yeah. If I had to jump straight from college, I would have been a complete failure. And as an entrepreneur I learned how to communicate, did a lot of communicating internally and a very little bit externally, and I think that’s where I struggled the most when I left my corporate job, was communicating directly with clients because I was just communicating with managers and other employees. But to me I feel like a… what do you call it? Not, oh, Lord. A late bloomer in terms of business skills, not born an entrepreneur at all. Very nervous, very shy. And so working in the corporate environment gave me some time to develop the ability to communicate and get my ideas across and hear no, and be okay with it, as well as just like the tenacity to keep trying.

Austin Saylor:

So I tried probably like half a dozen similar businesses, little side hustles that all failed. I know that if I had tried to leave a company to do those, they would have failed even… Failing lots of side gig is not a big deal. And when I finally took the plunge and left the job, I had a lot more confidence. And I think at the time I was like, “I don’t like my job so much. I didn’t learn anything here. I could have been so much better if I was somewhere else. I could have learned more things.” But looking back, I can go. I learned how to do HTML code. So when I do my own emails, I’m able to do that. I learned how to shoot videos. I actually learned how to animate at that job. A lot of the actual skills of what I do now I learned there, as well as the soft skills of communication. So to me it was huge to be able to be in that environment first.

Skyler Irvine:

Which social media platform or platforms do you have the most success on for either growing your business or building your network?

Austin Saylor:

Yeah, I was on Instagram before the algorithm kicked in and I basically became really good friends with other people who had large audiences. I was collaborating with these designers. And so anytime I collaborated with them, they would post my thing and I would end up getting 40 to a hundred new followers. So for a while it was the sweet spot of just like, people would post and I would get hundreds of followers. So I built my… And my audience is like 7,000 or something like that on Instagram and that built an audience to be able to teach. Twitter was where I built my network, really. Instagram was an audience that wanted to learn from me. Twitter was the place where I’ve connected with people. And so all of the connections I’ve made that have helped partnerships and ended up… This Project 200K, everything’s from Twitter, all of the connections that I’m making there have helped me hit this… Close to hitting the 200K mark. Yeah. So that’s how I’ve utilized those two networks.

Skyler Irvine:

I’d love to know how you learned that over time, always been something you’ve known or that is what you now believe and that you now push for others to try to emulate?

Austin Saylor:

I think I was listening to people who are very into Gary V, give, give, give, ask. Yeah. I can’t remember who all. I got a number of online influencers who are like build relationships, think in the longterm. And to me as a shy person, I liked connections but I didn’t like putting myself out there. So as soon as I could get into a DM and have a one-to-one conversation that’s where I was like, I’m golden there, and it took a lot of… I spent two years blogging once a week to get comfortable with just my voice, finding my voice, not naturally confident in expressing my opinions. And I’m only now getting a little better, but yeah, the networking is everything for me.

Skyler Irvine:

Was blogging an easier step for you because it was just a written forum and sharing your message or was that just as difficult to also put yourself out there?

Austin Saylor:

It was easy because I had nobody reading it and yeah, when I started I still had my full-time job and it was like I wanted to show up and develop my voice, and I knew that while I didn’t have an audience that’s a blessing and even though it doesn’t feel like it, you want the big audience quick, but when you don’t have an audience, you can make mistakes. And so my progression was getting comfortable expressing myself through words and then starting to… I knew I wanted to get on video, but it can be the scariest thing when you have never done it before. So I got on Snapchat where I had no followers. I had an Instagram account but they didn’t have the snap, the stories feature. So I was getting on Snapchat to practice doing daily videos.

Austin Saylor:

And so I’d get on there and talk to the camera, that got me more comfortable to be able to do YouTube videos, which when I went freelance, I decided I’m going to do the Casey Neistat thing. I’m going to daily vlog, that lasted for about seven days, because that was too intense for me, but it really helped let other people know that I left my job and I’m doing this new thing and that… Because I’d already built up the network, those people who saw what I was doing, it was interesting content because I was talking about, what is it like to leave a corporate job to go do your own thing? And then the job started coming from my network as like, “Oh yeah, Austin is available. Let’s send him work because I’m busy.” So yeah, an interesting progression of just always getting myself a little bit out of my comfort zone.

Austin Saylor:

And since then it’s become reaching out to people who own bigger businesses directly and saying, “Hey, I’d love to partner with you.” Which is scary. I still have… There’s like a person I want to email that I keep putting off because I’m nervous. It’s like, that’s just my next step of putting myself out there and getting uncomfortable to get outside results, but I didn’t think were ever possible when I was going through graphic design school, because I was told graphic designers make upwards of 60,000 when you’re good. And I was like, “I want to make more than that.” And yeah.

Skyler Irvine:

And not only that, you want to help others make more than that, which is what’s so cool about the Project 200K. You touched on so many great items there that I think a lot of people can relate to, especially the strengths of having no audience. I think anytime you think you have a weakness is actually… you can use it as a strength. I know a lot of people with large audiences that are so afraid to either start over on a new platform with no followers and feel like a loser, or put out a piece of content that would make them lose everything they’ve built. And when you don’t have any of that, you don’t have those fears. So everyone always wants what the other person has, and understanding that what you have is the strength that you can use and how you’ve progressed over time is really, really cool. How would you give advice to someone looking to have similar success on something like Instagram or Twitter, the way you did?

Austin Saylor:

I did two things. One is connect with more people earlier, and connect often. If you want to give yourself a challenge, do a 30 day challenge where you reach out to somebody new every day and just let… give gratitude about something that they’ve done, something that you appreciate. And if you build a habit of reaching out to new people, it’s amazing the kind of opportunities that will come about, that can a long ways down the road or it can be immediate. I ran a challenge in Full Harbor membership where we all did that, and a girl got two animation gigs with two of her favorite YouTubers just from reaching out to them and not asking for a job, they were just like, “Oh, we love your work. Will you animate for us?” So, yeah. I love the long game of reaching out to people all the time and always be networking, always be connecting with new people.

Austin Saylor:

The other one is, don’t be afraid to ask stupid questions. I started asking stupid questions more often this year, and it’s amazing how many people… If I’m on a call with five people and I’m the one that says, “So what does UGC mean? I don’t know what that means.” Three people will be like, “Oh my gosh, I didn’t know either. Thanks for asking that.” And they’ve been in the company for longer than me and just being willing to look like an idiot, to learn something faster rather than going, I want to impress you. So I’m going to pretend like I know what you’re talking about, and then I’m not actually going to learn anything because I’m scrambling to figure it out, just willing to yeah, look stupid. Just you can learn so much faster that way.

Skyler Irvine:

It’s fantastic advice. And I think the person who then explains what UGC is, they’re never like, “Oh, you dummies.” They always become almost more closely invested in you understanding what it is. And it tightens a relationship instead of pushes away.

Austin Saylor:

And people love to help.

Skyler Irvine:

That’s the thing. People really love to help and if they do help you, they’re invested in you succeeding long-term, even if you leave the company or whatever, they’ve helped you, they want to know what you’re doing in the next place and introduce you to someone new, it’s really powerful. Not being afraid to be stupid, you realize a lot of people don’t know and the people that do know really do want to help. And I think that’s almost a super power once you can learn that. What would you say today most people misunderstand about you?

Austin Saylor:

I think people don’t understand how nervous and scared I am most of the time. I try not to put that out because the confidence is an important thing to portray as well as the realness of… With Project 200K, I’ve talked about how I’m no happier this year than I was last year. I still get sad. I still get depressed. But the thing about it is I don’t stress about money anymore. I’m not worried about that on a day-to-day basis. I’m shy. I’m quiet. I’m nervous. I worry, but I try to be confident in my messaging because I want people to listen and I want to grow my audience and I want to help people. And when you go, “I don’t know. I think maybe you should think about raising your rates.” That’s not going to help anybody, if you really believe something, say it.

Skyler Irvine:

I think an easy hack to overcome the competence thing and I see this, I’ve helped a lot of non-competent people create content and what I see work almost a hundred percent of the time is passion. And when people talk about something they’re passionate about, the confidence comes up accidentally. Asking someone something they don’t understand or they’re not passionate about, it’s more of a lack of caring. When someone really cares whether or not they’re confident or not, you can just tell they care, and I can listen to two people talk about almost any topic if they’re super obsessed with it. It’s really fun for me. It’s exciting.

Austin Saylor:

That’s the great point. I love that.

Skyler Irvine:

Well, thank you. We should start a podcast together. What do most people misunderstand about what you’re doing and how would you want to correct that?

Austin Saylor:

I’m always trying to figure that one out, because I’m the guy who knows what’s going on, and so I’m trying to understand where’s the miscommunication happening. And so when I’m speaking with somebody who has never interacted with emotion designer before a common misconception could be like, “Oh, you animate Disney commercials or Disney films.” And it’s like, “No, it’s commercial work. I’m doing ads and YouTube video animations.” And then yes, I’m always trying to figure out the wording of how motion design doesn’t exactly explain things like graphic designers for video. Yeah. I think that there’s a misconception of even the value of it. It can feel a little like it’s fun and people get taken advantage of because this industry can be considered fun. Being an artist is fun and cool.

Austin Saylor:

And so, “Oh, well you love what you do. Why would you charge a whole bunch for it?” It’s like, “Well, it’s highly valuable.” And this year being on Project 200K I’ve seen some ridiculously valuable projects or highly paid. I’m like a cog in the wheel on some of these projects and I’m getting paid extremely well. And it’s just like a little fraction of the full budget. And it’s like, whoa, going from doing maximum 10K projects to, I’m getting paid 23,000 on a project but I’m just one person in this whole thing. It must be… and I don’t know a full budgets on some of these, but yeah, there’s money out there and the stuff is valuable.

Skyler Irvine:

I think that’s a really awesome side effect about creating your own category. When early on you’re told 60,000 is what you’ll make, that’s a limiting belief and A, you’re in a category that is absolutely growing because more people need that. But we’re also in a world where everything is changing in a way where you could almost take any industry you’re in and start a YouTube channel about it, and have that be an additional way to monetize. And whether you’re a teacher or a graphic designer or an athlete, there are so many opportunities to add revenue streams that didn’t exist before. I would love that to be one of the takeaways of this episode is how those limiting beliefs of income or revenue streams are such a thing of the past, and you’re obviously a glaring example of that.

Austin Saylor:

Yeah, and thanks. I have been asked recently, why did you want to go do freelance? And to me it’s like freelance… Project 200K is about seeing how much I can make with freelance motion design as a… If you’re focused and you really… I have got a lot of years under my belt and I have skills and a confidence built up in a network, but freelance isn’t the goal for me, figuring out how to make money with the skills that I have and the network that I have is more of the goal. I’m interested in what other revenue streams can I build with this skill. Personally, I’m not interested in building a business in the traditional sense. I’m not trying to build a big team. I’m more interested in experimenting with generating revenue, which is a business. In my world a bunch of artists they only see themselves as being able to sell their service and I’m like, “No, there’s so many other options. They’re not all easy but once you get started, things can pick up and actually go well.”

Austin Saylor:

Another thing that I don’t think people really grasp well enough, at least maybe at our age-ish are starting to understand that the world is changing all the time and it’s like the world we grew up in isn’t the world we’re in today, and the world that our parents lived in. We can see that our careers are looking different than our parents careers did, but it’s still going to keep changing even more, even just simply the 401k and Roth IRA didn’t exist hardly 40 or 50 years ago, even that concept is totally new to the world. And just the… I don’t know, the way that business shifts and how quickly it shifts, I think we underestimate how different things are going to look in the next 10 or 20 years.

Skyler Irvine:

Yeah. Pensions used to be worked for one company, stay there forever and get your pension. The 401k and the Roth IRA they can follow you to new companies which is new. You almost get rewarded by switching companies faster because you get a higher pay than if you stay at a company, and the statistics show that those who jump around from careers end up earning more from those careers. And that’s so counterintuitive to what our parents knew and I agree with you, a lot of these changes are going to continue happening but only faster. What’s something that’s happened since launching your business that you completely didn’t expect.

Austin Saylor:

I didn’t expect how much… And this is, I guess, from leaving my job to launching this thing. I didn’t expect how much I would enjoy connecting with people as somebody who was real. My parents continually… I’ve been doing this for… I left my job, I guess six years ago, my parents are constantly like, “I still can’t believe you going to connect with people.”

Austin Saylor:

And I think as to what you were saying earlier about the confidence thing, when you find something that you’re passionate about that it can light a fire that’s that’s so real, as opposed to the corporate job that I had, that I felt like I was trying to build a portfolio to get another job that might’ve felt the same and leaving and going into something that I was passionate about or has started to build passion around. It’s changed the way I look at things. Everything looks like an opportunity at this point, whether it’s just meeting up with somebody new or having a new experience. I think I looked at things a little bit more defensively before, and now I see things as more of like, “Okay, how can I use this to my advantage?” Or just as something positive.

Skyler Irvine:

Okay, I’m going to hit you with some rapid fire questions as we get ready to close out of here. What’s your favorite productivity hack, and how did you discover it?

Austin Saylor:

A hundred pushups a day. Actually, a friend of mine started doing a hundred pushups a day and I was like, “I want to do that.” And so I’ve been on and off about it, but when I’m on and doing a hundred pushups a day, the blood’s flowing. I feel like I’ve accomplished something, it’s like the… What do you call it? Make your bed every morning to knock something easy off the list.

Skyler Irvine:

A hundred push-ups isn’t that easy. Yeah. Is it a hundred-

Austin Saylor:

I think my body…

Skyler Irvine:

… push-ups in the morning, or is it throughout the day?

Austin Saylor:

It’s sets of 25, and so I’m doing them whenever I fit them in. To me it’s easy it’s like, I’ve got good upper body strength. And so it takes me about four minutes to get a hundred pushups throughout the day. And I have no excuse to not spend four minutes working out, it’s easy. So, it also gets good results. My t-shirts fit better and my arms are stronger.

Skyler Irvine:

What is an underrated tool that you would say is indispensable to your job? Whether it’s an app or a physical product or anything.

Austin Saylor:

Ridiculously niche is like some plugins for after effects like Overlord and Motion Three, but that’s like ridiculously niche.

Skyler Irvine:

No, it’s a great B niche. I was just talking about just physique, about how one of these plugins can save hours of work and it’s so worth it.

Austin Saylor:

Oh yeah. So those are some of my favorites. I’m actually re kicking off my YouTube channel to talk about all my favorite plugins, because they’ve saved me so much time. Another one is Toggl by Track or Track Toggl, whatever. T-O-G-G-L, it’s basically a time tracker. A track… pretty much everything I do.

Skyler Irvine:

Is it an app or like a Chrome extension or toggle?

Austin Saylor:

It’s an Apple on the Mac at… They may have a PC version and I have it on my iPhone. So my favorite part about it is it has a reminder if you haven’t started tracking something, it’s like, “Hey, don’t forget to track something.” And then if you leave and come back and your computer has been idle, it would be like, “Do you want to add this idle time?” I might’ve been sketching off on a piece of paper. So I still want to track the time or if I left, forgot to turn it off, I can say discontinue or discount all of that time was like idle. So it’s just super intuitive and helpful.

Skyler Irvine:

Does it ever say you’ve been away for four minutes, are you doing pushups?

Austin Saylor:

It should. I think five is the minimum, but I’ve come back over the weekend. It’s been like, “You’ve been gone for 2,300 minutes.”

Skyler Irvine:

That’s really good. It reminds me of the Apple watch that… Post back surgery, I’ve been going for a lot of walks and if I don’t set it for a walk but it’s like, “Hey, I think you’re walking. Do you want to record this? Or do you want to track this?” Those reminders I think are crucial. So Toggle, T-O-G-G-L-E.

Austin Saylor:

No, E.

Skyler Irvine:

No, E. It’s one of those fancy ones with no E.

Austin Saylor:

I’m glad I asked you that.

Skyler Irvine:

What occupation other than your own, would you like to try?

Austin Saylor:

I’m so interested in personal finance, building wealth, managing day-to-day money, thinking long picture. And it’s actually where I feel like I’m pushing my own trajectory is into the money realm, which is going to be generating money as well as managing and thinking about the future. So I’m pushing myself to go in that route anyways. So yeah, that’s something I’ve only been interested in for the past, maybe 10 years. It’s not numbered. I’m not an accountant. I hate numbers, but I love thinking about money for some reason.

Skyler Irvine:

I’m very similar to you. I struggle with numbers until I put a dollar sign in front of them

Austin Saylor:

Ooh, that’s interesting.

Skyler Irvine:

What are two or three books that you would recommend to my audience and why those books?

Austin Saylor:

Deep Work is always my number one go-to recommendation by Cal Newport. It’s about working smart in a digital world where we have so many distractions. It gives you a lot of permission to cut things off and totally focus because we can’t get a lot of really important mental work, knowledge work done in 10 minutes snippets. He’s like, get yourself a 90 minute chunk of time, but we’re so distracted that it might take you a lot of reps to build up to 90 full minutes of un-distracted work. So that’s been super huge for me. Another one that I’m not quite done with, but it’s so good that I have to recommend it is, The Psychology of Money, that was in person. I talk about it like once a week, I can’t get over how good that book is. I’m so jealous that he wrote it and I didn’t. It’s so good. I’m very slowly going through it because it’s just… there’s so much good stuff in there. I was starting to take notes and I’m like, “Wait, I’m just trying to copy every page.” So.

Skyler Irvine:

You’re saying, I think I highlighted the whole book, but there are certain books I come across where it’s like, okay, this is going to be my first read through where I’m going to highlight stuff, I’m just going to read through it because I know I’m going to come back to this. I want to go deeper on these subjects, but that is a great recommendation. Psychology of Money, Morgan Housel, I believe.

Austin Saylor:

Yeah. One other recommendation is not a book, but a podcast series. And the concept is Building a Second Brain by Tiago Forte, really fascinating. I feel like I tell everybody I talk to about this and only like 10% are really interested, but the people who are interested in it they’re like, “Oh my gosh, this is the freaking coolest thing.” So in case 10% of the listeners have any interest in basically building a… This is the thing I haven’t figured out maybe how to explain it, but it’s like taking but smart, and in ways that you’re building up your ideas throughout your whole career, you know how you can write a note somewhere and you forget about it. Well, the idea of The Second Brain is you do it in such a way that it’s easy to come back to and you don’t know what you used to know.

Austin Saylor:

I can read through my journals and be like, “I wrote that.” And so the idea of The Second Brain is building up over your lifetime something that no one else in the world has because no one’s had all the experiences you’ve had, instead of starting from scratch, you get to go, “Oh, I’ve written about this idea before, let me go find it.” And I’m notorious for Evernote and Dropbox, and Google Drive and my notes app. And this helps me put it all into one place and things that have to be somewhere else are intentionally somewhere else. Anyway, so that’s Building a Second Brain by Tiago Forte is just a really interesting concept.

Skyler Irvine:

And you said it was a podcast series?

Austin Saylor:

Yeah. He has a podcast called Building a Second Brain, and that’s how I binged the idea. But he’s got blog posts and I think he has a course that’s a higher end price course and I’m just like, “I love this concept so much. I might take it.”

Skyler Irvine:

Smart. I love that. That was a great concept. You give, give, give, and then you want to pay him a bunch of money because you want to [crosstalk 00:30:23]. All right. Let’s close out with this. What’s one question that you wish I would have asked you and how would you have answered it?

Austin Saylor:

I might have to take just a few seconds to think about this.

Skyler Irvine:

Yeah, no worries. We’ve got the power and magic of editing. So take as much time as you need. We’ll cut out that gap.

Austin Saylor:

Oh, I think I wish you had asked me, if you’re going to hit 200K this year, what’s your plan for next year? You want to do it again? What’s the deal, 300K? And my answer is, I don’t know. But I think my point-

Skyler Irvine:

You happen to hit it, didn’t you?

Austin Saylor:

I haven’t hit it yet, but I’m going to.

Skyler Irvine:

Oh, I thought I saw you tweeted that you had.

Austin Saylor:

Oh, no. I’m close.

Skyler Irvine:

Or maybe I just read it, okay.

Austin Saylor:

Yeah. And my goal for next year would be to… I think I want to hit 200K working. I’ll figure out the numbers, but fewer hours.

Skyler Irvine:

I love this answer.

Austin Saylor:

And to be able to coach, I don’t know, 20 people. Basically I want to help other people start towards this path of making more, but not being a grinded out and do tons and tons of hours. I had several ridiculous weeks in April, three weeks in a row in April that sucked. They were awful, but I made like $33,000 in April, that was my best month. I pushed myself too much. I wanted to find my own limit, but on average I think I’ve worked six and a half hours a day per working day this year. But if I could bring that down to average of five hours a day and make 200K and then have time to do things I want, be able to use the money more. Yeah, that’s my answer for that.

Skyler Irvine:

That’s everything I wanted in this podcast moving forward, was getting away from moving of the goalposts of, “I made 200 this year. So next year is 300.” And it’s like, but why? What will happen to 300? Are we going to move the goalposts again to 400? And then you’re working eight hours a week just to hit these numbers for no real reason. Creating a life for yourself I think should be the goal. The ultimate goal with any business and you’re a great testament to that, and your journey is awesome and hearing you say, “How can I maintain this but putting in less work hours, so I have more hours to do the things I want to do?” Is to me what I want for most people.

Skyler Irvine:

Unfortunately, most people have to go through the grind and get to that point of burnout before they will start to listen to advice like yours. But the fact that you came up with that as your own question was a great way to end this episode. So Austin, I thank you so much. I will post more information about everything you touched on Project 200K, Full Harbor and your social media. For you personally, where’s the best way for people to connect with you today and learn more about you and all the awesome things you’re doing?

Austin Saylor:

Yeah. You can go to fullharvard.com/200k if you want to sign up on my email list and I send regular updates, but if you want to connect with me on a DM or something, Twitter is Full Harbor and Instagram I am Full Harbor there as well.

Skyler Irvine:

Awesome. Thank you so much, man. I really appreciate you. Hopefully, we can do this again soon and congratulations on all your success and living in New York during a global pandemic.

Austin Saylor:

Yes. Thank you.

Skyler Irvine:

Thanks man. I appreciate it.

Links

BOOKS:

Deep Work – Cal Newport

Psychology of Money – Morgan Housel

Niche, Please – Skyler Irvine

APPS:

TOGGL – Time Tracking